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Chicago Personal Injury Lawyer Alert: European E. coli outbreak spreads to the United States

Illinois personal injury lawyers are concerned with the potential for an outbreak of the deadly European e. coli strain in the United States. According to the Washington Post, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported a total of 5 cases of the European E. coli strain in the United States.

The first four cases caught the virus when traveling to Hamburg, Germany. The fifth became infected merely from being in close contact with one of the other four. Of the five cases, one is confirmed to be the same e. coli strain that has killed 36 and caused over 3,000 to become ill. Most of those Europeans who died from the e. coli strain had developed a rare form of kidney failure called hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). Of the five U.S. citizens, three have developed HUS. The three HUS cases were reported in Michigan, Wisconsin, and Massachusetts. The Massachusetts case is the case that is confirmed to be a result of the same strain in Europe.

Fortunately, German health officials have traced the outbreak to a sprout farm in Lower Saxony state in northern Germany. Chicago e. coli lawyers are relieved to know that, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are no confirmed e. coli cases of infected U.S. military personnel or their dependents stationed in Germany. However, everyone should learn more about foodborne illnesses as food poisoning lawsuits become more common.

According to a U.S. Centers fore Disease Control and Prevention report, 1 in 6 U.S. citizens or 48 million people in the United States get sick from food poisoning every year. Of those 48 million, 128,000 people are hospitalized due to food poisoning and 3,000 ultimately die from it. The top five pathogens that cause death are salmonella, toxoplasma gondii, listeria monocytogenes, norovirus, and campylobacter.

Chicago personal injury lawyers at Levin and Perconti encourage everyone to be aware of the latest outbreaks of foodborne illness in the world and take precautions to prevent food poisoning. As evidenced by the newest e. coli strain in Europe, what happens in other countries can affect the health of our own.