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Levin & Perconti obtains $607,500 settlement for child’s injury

Levin & Perconti attorney Jeffrey Martin has obtained a settlement award of $607,500 for an Illinois child who lost a finger due to a nurse’s negligence. The child was born in June 2004, 10 weeks premature, and was placed in the hospital’s Special Care Nursing Unit. Although she was able to breathe on her own, she had to be fed intravenously through a peripheral IV line. Two days after the Illinois child was born, her mother got the chance to hold her newborn daughter for the first time. She noticed that the area around the insertion site was swollen and alerted a nurse who told her it was caused by the bandage holding the IV in place.

In the afternoon, a second nurse examined the baby’s hand and noted that the site was red and swollen. When removing the dressing, she found the infant’s little, ring, and middle fingers were becoming black in color. When the baby’s doctor evaluated her, the doctor determined that the IV had infiltrated into her right hand; IV fluid had escaped out of a vein and into the surrounding tissue. When the nurse had removed the IV, she failed to dilute the infiltrated fluid and the caustic fluid continued to burn through the bone in the baby’s little finger. Despite treatment, the baby’s fingers had sustained serious burns. Six weeks after she was born, the baby’s little finger fell off on its own.

Levin & Perconti attorney Jeffrey Martin stated: “The nurses deviated from the standard of care when they failed to examine and document the condition of Jessica’s IV site every hour.” The nurses’ negligence allowed serious injury to occur and led to the loss of the child’s little finger. A portion of the $607,500 settlement will be distributed through a structured annuity and will provide for the child’s college costs and living expenses, periodic payments into her young adult years, and monthly payments for life.

Click here to read more about the $607,500 settlement that Levin & Perconti obtained for an injured child.