December 17, 2012

Rockford Helicopter Crash Raises Questions on Safety

by Levin & Perconti

A fatal helicopter crash that occurred 30 miles south of Rockford on Monday night has raised questions on the safety of helicopters, reports the Chicago Tribune. The fatal accident claimed the lives of the pilot and two nurses while they were heading back to Rockford community hospital after aborting their planned flight to Mendota Community Hospital because of deteriorating weather conditions. Bad weather is the most common cause of all aviation accidents, and the National Weather Service reported light snow and sleet that day.

After this accident, the National Transportation Safety Board (“NTSB”) is pressuring the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”) to mandate safety improvements for the oft-dangerous air ambulance industry. The current system is voluntary compliance; an FAA strategy that critics say is not effective enough. For example, there are broad inconsistencies in pilot training; safety-related communications and navigation equipment aboard medical helicopters are handled by independent operators hired mostly by hospitals, who may not have sufficient training. In fact, the job of helicopter emergency crewmember ranks as the highest-risk occupation based upon death rates, beating out deep-sea fisherman, and logger as well as nine other hazardous jobs according to a study conducted a few years ago by Dr. Ira Blumen of the University of Chicago Hospitals.

Emergency medical helicopter pilots often make decisions about weather conditions while in the middle of a flight, and because most of their trips involve life or death situations, many pilots choose to continue their trips even though weather conditions are dangerous. Stricter safety mandates by the FAA could decrease such dangerous decisions by these courageous helicopter pilots. The NTSB has made over 50 recommendations to government and the air ambulance industry since 1988, but so far they have fallen on deaf ears. However the FAA may eventually be forced to act on this issue as the air ambulance industry continues to grow dramatically and the fatalities are beginning to mount. The NTSB reports at least 110 emergency medical helicopter crashes, with over 105 fatalities from 2003 through July of this year. In 2008 alone 29 people died in 13 accidents. The FAA recommends that operators should take advantage of digital data programs that help predict weather patterns so that they will make more informed decisions about whether to fly during adverse weather conditions. On the other hand, the NTSB recommends the use of flight simulators, night-vision imaging systems and autopilot technology on the medical helicopters. However, very few of these have been officially adopted by the FAA.

Our aviation law attorneys have extensive experience with the complexities of this area of the law, which has enabled us to achieve million dollars in verdicts and settlements for our injured clients. We represent clients in the Chicago, Illinois area who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents like this most recent one outside of Rockford. We have fought to bring justice to clients and their families who have been injured by the negligence of others via aviation accidents. If you have suffered in injury or lost a loved one in an aviation accident, contact our offices for a free consultation to discuss your legal options.

June 26, 2012

Chicago Airplane Crash Lawsuit Filed After Evidence Arises Pointing to Potential of Engine Failure

by Levin & Perconti

Although the crash happened internationally, the Associated Press reports that a man whose wife died when a commercial airliner crashed into a crowded neighborhood overseas has recently filed a lawsuit here in Chicago that blames the accident, at least in part, on U.S. companies that designed, manufactured, and sold parts for, the defective plane.

The lawsuit was filed this month in the U.S. District Court in Chicago on behalf of the man whose wife was one of the victims of a plane crash that also happened earlier this month, and which killed at least 153 passengers who were on-board the aircraft, as well as an undetermined number of civilians on the ground. Because a complete death toll could take several weeks to complete, officials aren’t yet sure of the extent of the damage, though reports indicate that the aircraft crashed into two apartment buildings and two local businesses.

Apparently, as the airplane was on its way down, the flight’s captain radioed air traffic controllers, declaring an emergency because both of the aircraft’s engines had failed. As a result, the suit is being brought against, among others, Chicago-based Boeing Co., which bought the McDonnell-Douglas manufacturer of the plane, and American-based engine-maker Pratt & Whitney, reports the Associated Press.

Boeing is one of the largest global aircraft manufacturers, and the third-largest aerospace and defense contractor in the world. Pratt & Whitney, the producers of the plane’s allegedly faulty engine, is an American aerospace manufacturer, and is considered one of the three largest aero-engine manufacturers in the world, selling products in more than 180 countries around the world.

Although the cause of the accident has not yet been concretely determined, the Chicago aviation accident lawsuit was filed to ensure that the man’s attorneys would have legal recourse to request the plane's flight voice and data recorders and other evidence, said the Associated Press

An important concept in Illinois personal injury law is the idea that companies are responsible for ensuring the safety of products that they put on the market, including automobile parts that are used as parts of motor vehicles. Corporations are expected to test their merchandise to ensure that the products conform to applicable safety regulations, and when dangerous or defective products are disseminated to the public, the companies may be held legally responsible for injuries that arise from the use of those hazardous products. This is especially true when the companies’ products are used as elements in public transportation where the potential to harm a large number of people is great.

If, in fact, investigations reveal that the airplane’s equipment was faulty, under notions of products liability law, either the manufacturer of the airplane’s engines or the airline who was responsible for the plane’s repairs may be liable for damages resulting from the tragic deaths. The airline would be responsible for maintaining safe equipment, and if their failure to do so led to the crash, they could be held legally responsible for the deaths.

Our Chicago wrongful death attorneys represent clients across Illinois who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents. Our attorneys have extensive experience with the unique challenges and complexities of aviation law, which has enabled us to achieve many multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for our clients, including a $2.33 million settlement for the family of a pilot whose Cessna plane crashed due to a defective carburetor part. Our attorneys understand that these accidents can be emotionally traumatizing for victims and their families, and have the compassion and experience to help guide their clients through the requisite legal processes.

June 3, 2012

Today's Devastating Plane Crash Raises Issues of Aviation Law and Liability

by Levin & Perconti

This afternoon, our Chicago aviation accident attorneys were devastated by the news of a colossal airplane accident that may have killed as many as 153 people. Authorities have not yet established a final death count on today’s crash, but have announced that they are not expecting to find survivors, reported MSNBC.

Local reports also indicate that, in addition to passengers and crew aboard the plane, an unknown number of civilians may have also been killed at the location where the plane went down. MSNBC reports that the aircraft crashed into a building and broke into two before burning up; at least three buildings were severely damaged, and people inside were likely to be hurt as well.

Although it’s still too early to officially proclaim the cause of the accident, witnesses stated that the plane may have hit a power line, despite good visibility in clear and sunny weather. Additionally, the plane had been undergoing repairs for several weeks, said MSNBC.

If it is found that the pilot was responsible for the crash, either by negligence or recklessness in the way he flew the plane, the commercial airline may be held liable for the pilot’s actions and for injuries that resulted from the crash. An important concept in Illinois personal injury law is the idea that corporations are responsible for training and supervising their employees; therefore when the employees’ actions cause injury to others, the company may be liable for the damages those injuries cause. In the event that wrongful death lawsuits are filed on behalf of the families of the deceased victims, family members might be seeking damages in the form of lost companionship and future lost wages.

If, on the other hand, investigations reveal that the airplane’s equipment was faulty, under notions of products liability law, either the manufacturer of the airplane or the company who was responsible for its repairs may be liable for damages resulting from the tragic deaths. The airline would be responsible for maintaining safe equipment, and if their failure to do so led to the crash, they could be held legally responsible for the deaths.

Our Chicago wrongful death attorneys represent clients across Illinois who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents. Our attorneys have extensive experience with the unique challenges and complexities of aviation law, which has enabled us to achieve many multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for our clients, including a $2.33 million settlement for the family of a pilot whose Cessna plane crashed due to a defective carburetor part. Our attorneys understand that these accidents can be emotionally traumatizing for victims and their families, and our attorneys have the compassion and experience to help their clients through the legal process of recovering damages.

In order to be successful in complex aviation accidents, our attorneys have relied on close, long-standing relationships with renowned aviation experts and other industry personnel that have proven to be an invaluable asset to clients seeking their rightful damages. A successful outcome in aviation accident litigation requires an understanding of the all the various issues that arise when an aviation accident occurs. If you or a loved one have been injured in an airplane, helicopter, or other aircraft accident, contact an attorney immediately to understand your rights under the law.

April 2, 2012

Illinois Lawsuit Filed over Potentially Faulty Air Force Fighter Planes

by Levin & Perconti

Suffocating from a lack of available oxygen is scary, but the sensation is even more terrifying when that oxygen deprivation occurs while piloting an aircraft.

According to a recent report by ABC News, the Air Force has been investigating the source of a mysterious, recurring problem in which pilots in the cockpits of F-22 airplanes have reported experiencing "hypoxia-like symptoms,” or a lack of oxygen, in mid-air.

This particular investigation comes on the heels of an Illinois wrongful death case filed by the widow of a pilot who died after a failure in his aircraft cut off oxygen supply during a training mission; allegedly, because of the fact that the oxygen system shut off, the pilot’s plane “entered a sharp dive and, seconds later, crashed, spreading debris more than a quarter mile,” recounted the Air Force's investigative report into the incident. The inquiry also showed he caused him to experience "a sense similar to suffocation," prior to the crash.

The pilot’s widow has brought the Illinois airplane crash lawsuit against the F-22's manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, for wrongful death, negligence and fraud. Also named in the suit are other businesses and defense contractors, including Boeing, Honeywell International, and Pratt and Whitney, all of whom are involved in manufacturing various aspects of the F-22 aircraft's systems.

The F-22 airplane is a fighter aircraft designed to be used in combat, and is a prime component in US tactical air power. Lockheed Martin Aeronautics, a branch of Lockheed Martin – the global aerospace, defense, and technology company – is the prime contractor, and is responsible for the majority of manufacturing and assembly of the aircraft. Lockheed Martin is one of the world’s largest defense contractors; in fact, in 2009, Secretary of Defense Robert Gates reported that 74% of Lockheed Martin's revenues came from military sales, accounting for 7.1% of the funds paid out by the Pentagon.

Last year, following the particular plane crash out of which this suit arose, the Air Force grounded the entire fleet of F-22 aircrafts to investigate the source of the problem. ABC News reports that they were unable to identify any single problem and have allowed the planes back in the air. Nevertheless, since at least 2008 several pilots have reported experiencing "hypoxia-like symptoms" in mid-air, as a result of a recurring problem with the aircraft’s oxygen system. Additionally, when testifying before Congress in March of this year, Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Norton Schwartz denied assigning blame to the pilot.

As a result, the pilot’s widow still believes the company is to blame. The complaint alleges that Lockheed Martin knowingly sold the U.S. Air Force "dangerous and defective" planes that did not provide life support systems "that would allow our pilots to survive even routine training missions,” reported ABC.

Our Chicago airplane accident attorneys represent clients in the Chicago, Illinois area who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents. There may be many different factors surrounding an airplane accident that can contribute to its cause. Some of these factors include:
• Faulty Equipment

• FAA Regulation Violations

• Pilot Errors

• Problems in the Design or Structure of an Aircraft

• Flight Service Station Employee Negligence

• Negligence in a Third Party Selection of a Carrier, or
• Federal Air Traffic Controller Negligence

Our attorneys have extensive experience with the unique challenges and complexities of aviation law, which has enabled them to achieve many multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for our clients, including a $2.33 million settlement for the family of a pilot whose Cessna plane crashed due to a defective carburetor part.

A successful outcome in aviation accident litigation requires an understanding of the all the various issues that arise when an aviation accident occurs. If you or a loved one have been injured in an airplane, helicopter, or other aircraft accident, contact an attorney immediately to understand your rights under the law.

December 26, 2011

$11.35 Verdict Awarded After Airplane Crash

by Levin & Perconti

Recently one of the largest ever air crash disaster verdicts was awarded to a doctor and his fiancé who were the survivors of a plane crash that left both permanently injured.

The $11.35 million verdict was awarded to the couple as compensation for their injuries and for the woman’s future loss of income; she had been a professional pilot, but can no longer fly because the lasting injuries preclude her from passing the Federal Aviation Administration’s (FAA’s) medical examination.

The judgment was against Winner Aviation, an American corporation that was responsible for maintaining the plane; the jury found that the plane had not been properly maintained prior to the crash, which was a principle cause of the accident. When a corporation voluntarily takes responsibility for ensuring the condition of equipment, and a failure on the part of the company to do so results in injuries to others, that company may be held legally liable for damages resulting from those injuries. In situations like these, Illinois personal injury lawsuits may arise.

The female victim piloted the twin-engine Cessna Skymaster airplane, which was owned by her fiancé. Shortly after take-off, the aircraft developed engine problems, and ultimately crashed; the woman was knocked unconscious, but was revived by the man, whose legs were crushed. Devastatingly, as the pair were trying to escape the plane, a wing exploded which engulfed the plane in fire. Both suffered respiratory injuries from breathing smoke and fuel, as well as severe third-degree burns.

The lawsuit alleged that post-accident investigations showed that Winner Aviation failed to repair the plane’s rear engine, and that the front engine was scheduled for an overhaul that never happened.

When someone is determined to be legally responsible for injuring someone else, they are liable for the harm caused and may be made to pay the injured person compensatory damages; this is also the case when the responsibility arises from a negligent failure to take required actions – such as in this case. Compensatory damages attempt to put an injured person back in the position he or she was in before being injured. In some cases, punitive damages may also be awarded, which are damages that are intended to punish wrongdoers and prevent them from harming others.

Our Chicago airplane accident attorneys represent clients in the Chicago, Illinois area who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents. There may be many different factors surrounding an airplane accident that can contribute to its cause. Some of these factors include:

• Faulty Equipment
• FAA Regulation Violations
• Pilot Errors
• Problems in the Design or Structure of an Aircraft
• Flight Service Station Employee Negligence
• Negligence in a Third Party Selection of a Carrier
• Federal Air Traffic Controller Negligence

Our Illinois personal injury lawyers have extensive experience with the unique challenges and complexities of aviation law, which has enabled them to achieve many multimillion dollar verdicts and settlements for our clients, including a $2.33 million settlement for the family of a pilot whose Cessna plane crashed due to a defective carburetor part.

December 2, 2011

Devastating Illinois Plane Crash Illustrates Complexity of Aviation Law

by Levin & Perconti

Our Chicago personal injury attorneys were devastated to hear about the recent airplane crash that occurred in Crystal Lake, Illinois, last week. According to a report in the Chicago Tribune, four people were killed when the plane went down near the Northwest Chicago Suburb on November 26.

The single-engine plane crashed in a field in McHenry County, near the intersection of U.S. Hwy. 14 and Ridgefield Road. Officials said that four out-of-state residents were killed when the plane crashed, but at the time of the Tribune’s report, the victims had not yet been identified. The McHenry County Deputy Coroner reported that the decedents appeared to be two men and two women, all of whom were over the age of 18. Fortunately no one on the ground was injured by the crash, but all four passengers were pronounced dead at the scene.

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) had no information as to the place from which the plane took off, or its ultimate destination. The FAA is the national aviation authority for the United States, and is an agency that regulates and oversees all aspects of aviation in the country. The FAA did, however, say that the aircraft’s pilot was operating under “Visual Flight Rules” and was not in touch with air traffic control.

When a pilot operates an airplane under Visual Flight Rules (VFR), it essentially means he or she is flying the plane under a set of regulations that are designed to allow a pilot to fly the plane based only on what the pilot can see out of the window of the cockpit. Under VFR, the weather must be clear and “better than basic VFR minimums,” as specified by the FAA – otherwise the pilot must use radio control or other flight instruments to guide the plane.

Visual Flight rules require that a pilot is able to see outside the window of the cockpit to navigate the aircraft and “see and avoid obstacles and other aircrafts.” Because they have chosen not to use outside help or devices to help fly the plane, pilots who fly under VFR assume responsibly for their flight. As per the Chicago Tribune’s coverage of the story, the National Transportation Safety Board is heading an investigation to determine whether the rules of flight were followed, if the plane was properly maintained and registered, and if the pilot was in fact licensed to fly the plane.

Continue reading "Devastating Illinois Plane Crash Illustrates Complexity of Aviation Law" »

November 13, 2011

Newlywed Couple Killed in Devastating Helicopter Crash

by Levin & Perconti

Our Chicago personal injury attorneys were saddened to read a recent news story about newlywed tourists killed in a sightseeing helicopter crash this past week.

MSNBC reported that the pilot and four passengers – including a newlywed couple – were killed when the helicopter went down. The passengers were on what was intended to be a 45-minute tour; local weather reports cited heavy rainsqualls in the area at the time, and officials are now considering that weather was a significant factor in the crash.

According to recent news reports, the EC-130 model helicopter involved in the crash was less than one year old, and had been leased from Nevada Helicopter Leasing LLC. The pilot was flying the plane as part of his employment with a company named Blue Hawaiian that conducts approximately 160,000 helicopter tours each year. This is Blue Hawaiian’s second helicopter crash this decade.

If it is found that the pilot was responsible for the crash, either by negligence or recklessness in the way he flew the helicopter, or by having chosen to fly despite unsafe weather conditions, the company may be held liable for the pilot’s actions, and for injuries that resulted from the crash. An important concept in Illinois personal injury law is the idea that corporations are responsible for training and supervising their employees; therefore when the employees’ actions cause injury to others, the company may be liable for the damages those injuries cause. In the event that wrongful death lawsuits are filed on behalf of the families of the deceased victims, family members might be seeking damages in the form of lost companionship and future lost wages.

If, on the other hand, investigations reveal that the helicopter’s equipment was faulty, under notions of products liability law, either the manufacturer of the helicopter or the company who leased the helicopter may be liable for damages resulting from the tragic deaths. The helicopter leasing company would be responsible for maintaining safe equipment, and if their failure to do so led to the crash, they could be held legally responsible for the deaths.

Our Chicago personal injury lawyers represent clients across Illinois who have suffered personal injuries or lost loved ones in aviation accidents. Our attorneys have extensive experience with the unique challenges and complexities of aviation law, which has enabled us to achieve many multimillion-dollar verdicts and settlements for our clients, including a $2.33 million settlement for the family of a pilot whose Cessna plane crashed due to a defective carburetor part. Our attorneys understand that these accidents can be emotionally traumatizing for victims and their families, and our attorneys have the compassion and experience to help their clients through the legal process of recovering damages.

In order to be successful in complex aviation accidents, our attorneys have relied on close, long-standing relationships with renowned aviation experts and other industry personnel that have proven to be an invaluable asset to clients seeking their rightful damages.

A successful outcome in aviation accident litigation requires an understanding of the all the various issues that arise when an aviation accident occurs. If you or a loved one have been injured in an airplane, helicopter, or other aircraft accident, contact an attorney immediately to understand your rights under the law.

November 7, 2011

First Lawsuit Filed Following Devastating Airplane Race Accident

by Levin & Perconti

The first lawsuit has been filed following a devastating situation in which a racing airplane crashed into bystanders during the National Championship Air Races. Our Chicago personal injury attorneys were saddened to hear that 11 people were killed in the tragic incident, and another 74 were injured.

The suit was filed this past Tuesday against the pilot’s family, a mechanic who serviced the WWII-era aircraft, and the organization hosting the event. According to a recent report released by the Associated Press, modifications had been made to the plane that were intended to improve its racing potential, but may have instead caused or contributed to cause the accident. The pilot – an expert movie stunt pilot and aircraft racer – was aware of the changes.

After the plane took off, it rolled over and plummeted into the occupied box-seats at a speed of more than 400 miles per hour.

Most airplane accidents and incidents that occur in this country are investigated by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), which looks at evidence from aviation accidents to determine cause. NTSB officials released a statement last month stating that no onboard video had been recovered, but technicians were still working to get answers from the aircraft’s onboard memory card; nevertheless, photos of the plane showed that a portion of the airplane’s tail was missing from the craft. Preliminary reports seem to suggest that the alterations to the aircraft may have been a root cause of the plane’s malfunction.

An attorney on behalf of the family of one of the deceased victims alleged that the pre-planning adaptations were carelessly made and created a formula for disaster. As a result, those who were responsible for ensuring the safety of the aircraft are liable for the damage incurred. The report by the Associated Press stated that the attorney said he wanted “hold ‘two groups of wrongdoers’ accountable: Those who pushed the limits of physics on the plane, being risk takers and reckless without regard for the people who might be watching them, and those who promoted and profited from hosting the show.”

Our Illinois personal injury attorneys are familiar with Aviation Law, and the determination of liability following aviation accidents. According to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, an ‘aviation accident’ is identified as “an occurrence associated with the operation of an aircraft which takes place between the time any person boards the aircraft with the intention of flight and all such persons have disembarked, in which a person is fatally or seriously injured, the aircraft sustains damage or structural failure or the aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible.” In essence, if the plane is supposed to fly and an accident takes place either involving a person or the craft itself, it is considered an aviation accident, and is covered under Aviation Law.

There may be many different factors surrounding an airplane accident which can contribute to its cause. Some of these factors include:
• Faulty Equipment
• FAA Regulation Violations
• Pilot Errors
• Problems in the Design or Structure of an Aircraft
• Flight Service Station Employee Negligence
• Negligence in a Third Party Selection of a Carrier
• Federal Air Traffic Controller Negligence

Our Chicago personal injury lawyers won a $2.32 million settlement on behalf of the family of a pilot whose Cessna small-engine airplane crashed shortly after takeoff because of a defective part in the carburetor. The lawsuit alleged that the manufacturers of the single-engine Cessna and its engine components had been aware of problems with a faulty carburetor part since 1963. As a result, they were aware of the dangers, and were able to be held liable for the damage that ensued.

If you or a loved one have been injured in an aviation accident, contact an attorney to be apprised of your rights under the law.

May 2, 2011

Airplane manufacturer denies blame for baseball player’s death

by Levin & Perconti

The manufacturer of the small plane that baseball player Cory Lidle and a flight instructor were piloting when they crashed into a Manhattan apartment building five years ago denied blame for the wrongful death. The lawyer for the plane manufacturer said that the victims, not the company, were to blame for their wrongful deaths. Opening statements recently begun in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by Mr. Lidle’s wife and the family of his flight instructor, blaming Cirrus Design Corporation for the flight crash. The baseball player was only 34 years of age and died just days after his baseball season ended. The wrongful death lawsuit plaintiff’s attorney told jurors that their lawsuit would prove that the company rushed the plane into production a decade ago with an inferior control system. The attorney stated that the victims desperately tried to re-engage a jammed steering system as the plane went out of control and dropped altitude in the last 45 seconds before the crash.

Continue reading "Airplane manufacturer denies blame for baseball player’s death" »

April 27, 2011

Chicago-bound flight slides off runway

by Levin & Perconti

Fortunately, no personal injuries have been reported after a Southwest Airlines flight at Chicago-Midway Airport slid off of a runway and into a patch of mud Tuesday afternoon. The flight, which was coming in from Denver, was carrying 134 passengers including five babies in addition to five crew members. According to the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”), the plane landed on the runway at a little after 1:00 p.m., sliding off of the left edge near the end of the runway. It came to a stop on a grassy area near the Chicago intersection of Cicero Avenue and 63rd Street, about 150 feet from a wall that separates the airport grounds from the street. The nose was pointed directly at a White Castle drive-through across Cicero Avenue.

The unharmed passengers were taken off of the plane down a wheeled stairway and the runway involved was shut down. The other runways at Chicago Midway Airport remained open. Tuesday’s weather was wet, rainy, and windy. The runway was also wet and winds were 15 knots gusting to 21 knots, according to the Chicago Tribune who had received the information from an aviation source. Passengers Tuesday evening recounted that the landing felt different than most - one passenger involved in the Chicago flight landing accident described that it felt like the plane was landing in a lake because of the water on the runway. Many of the passengers credited the pilot for their safety, saying that he landed in the best way possible, despite the difficulties.


Continue reading "Chicago-bound flight slides off runway" »

December 17, 2009

$7 million awarded to victim’s family in plane crash

by Levin & Perconti

A jury issued a wrongful death award of more than $7 million to the family of a passenger killed in a 2006 crash of a regional jet of Comair. The flight crashed after attempting to take off from a runway at an airport that was too short for commercial flights. Forty-nine people were wrongfully killed. This wrongful death lawsuit is the only passenger aviation accident lawsuit that has reached trial at this time. The next step of the process will occur next year. A different jury will decide next year if the Comair airline was negligent. If a jury determines that Comair is negligent, the family will be eligible for punitive damages. Click here to read more about the $7 million verdict.

Continue reading "$7 million awarded to victim’s family in plane crash" »

September 12, 2009

$15 Million awarded to Chicago family in wrongful death lawsuit

by Levin & Perconti

A Cook County Circuit Court judge has approved a $15 million settlement in a wrongful death lawsuit filed by a Chicago family. The wrongful death lawsuit followed a private plane crash in 2006.

To read more about the Chicago wrongful death verdict.

June 21, 2009

Air France will pay $24,500 to crash victims’ families

by Levin & Perconti

As an initial compensation for each victim of the recent airplane crash, Air France will pay families about $24,500. So far, Air France has been in touch with about 1800 relatives of the people who died when the airplane crashed. The company is also providing grief counseling.

To read more about the Air France proactive compensation measures.

June 16, 2009

Higher safety measures key to airline safety

by Levin & Perconti

Congress is currently holding hearings on airline safety and the attorneys at Levin & Perconti are following the latest developments. Enhanced airline safety measures are key to ensuring a minimum safety standard. Airlines must also ensure their pilots are experienced and properly trained.

To read more about current airline safety issues.

June 3, 2009

Personal injury lawsuit alleges that pilot negligence caused crash

by Levin & Perconti

A personal injury lawsuit alleges that pilot negligence is to blame for a March 2008 airplane crash. The pilot flew his plane into a thunderstorm when it exploded in mid-air.

To read more about the airplane crash lawsuit.

May 27, 2009

Personal injury lawsuit filed in fatal helicopter crash

by Levin & Perconti

The family of a flight nurse killed in the helicopter crash filed a wrongful death lawsuit. The personal injury lawsuit stems from an August 2008 crash when the helicopter was operating as an air ambulance. The wrongful death lawsuit seeks unspecified damages for the loss of their mother.

To read more about the fatal helicopter crash lawsuit.

May 19, 2009

Update on commuter airlines safety hearing

by Levin & Perconti

Last week, the National Transportation Safety Board held a hearing on a recent airplane crash. The hearing showed that regulatory changes for commuter airlines are needed. Last week, CBS interviewed the family of one of the recent flight victims.

To view the CBS clip on the airplane crash victims’ family.

January 18, 2009

Illinois Grand Jury Indicts Pilot who was Under the Influence when Plane Clipped House

by Levin & Perconti

An Illinois pilot was arrested after his plane crashed into a yard and clipped a house. The pilot was arrested after it was revealed that he was on alcohol and drugs. The pilot had been arrested and charged with operating an aircraft under the influence of drugs or alcohol. A DuPage County grand jury indicted him on seven counts based on allegations that he had the drugs in his system when the single-engine plane he was flying clipped a house and crashed into a neighboring yard. The plane crash occurred while the pilot was approaching a private airstrip near Downers Grove. Pilots face steeper penalties for flying drunk than motorists have for operating a vehicle. The pilot was the only person aboard at the time of the crash and no personal injuries were reported. To read the full story, click here.

January 13, 2009

Personal injury lawsuit filed against airline, pilot in aviation accident

by Levin & Perconti

The first personal injury lawsuit has been filed against Continental Airlines in response to a plane crash that happened last month. 37 passengers sustained injuries as a result of the crash when the airplane ran off the runway and into a ravine, catching fire. The complaint names the airline and two pilots alleging that pilot error was the most likely cause of the aviation accident. The lawsuit claims that the pilot “negligently aborted” the flight shortly after takeoff. For the full story, click here.

January 6, 2009

Family Files Suit after Helicopter Crash

by Levin & Perconti

The parents of a baby girl who was killed in a medical helicopter crash in Aurora, Illinois sued the companies that operated the helicopter. The lawsuit, filed in Cook County, was against Air Angels Inc. and Reach Medical Holdings. The suit alleges widespread negligence and systematic failures to follow safety practices that would have prevented the aviation accident. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of the parents whose 14-month-old daughter died when the helicopter taking her to Chicago’s Children Memorial Hospital struck a radio tower support wire and crashed in Aurora, Illinois. The pilot, a nurse and a paramedic on board also died in the helicopter accident. The National Safety Board has ruled out mechanical problems with the helicopter, indicating pilot error as probable cause. To read the full story, click here.